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BURN BRIGHT’S THEORY OF CHANGE

OUR EVIDENCE BASED THEORY OF CHANGE FOR PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND DELIVERY

An Overview Of Burn Bright’s Theory of Change

  • Mental Health In Australia

    We believe in a mentally healthy Australia!

  • Risk and Protective Factors

    Burn Bright targets specific risk and protective factors

  • Vision and Mission

    Burn Bright's specific vision and mission

  • Program Development Using Evidence Based Theory

    Our programs are underpinned and developed using a specific evidence base.

  • Program Delivery Using Evidence Based Theory

    Our programs are delivered in a certain way because thats what the evidence tells us works best!

OUR PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND DELIVERY IS ANCHORED IN A STRONG EVIDENCE BASE

RISK AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS

To effectively target mental health promotion activities the World Health Organisation (2005 & 2011) states that targeting risk and protective factors are the most effective area for reduction in mental illness rates. Risk and protective factors reside in the person, family, school, life events and social settings.

In describing risk and protective factors, The World Health Organisation (2005) states:

“Mental disorder prevention targets those determinants that have a causal influence, predisposing to the onset of mental disorders. Risk factors are associated with an increased probability of onset, greater severity and longer duration of major health problems. Protective factors refer to conditions that improve people’s resistance to risk factors and disorders. They have been defined as those factors that modify, ameliorate or alter a person’s response to some environmental hazard that predisposes to a maladaptive outcome. Mostly, individual protective factors are identical to features of positive mental health, such as selfesteem, emotional resilience, positive thinking, problem-solving and social skills, stress management skills and feelings of mastery. For this reason, preventive interventions aiming to strengthen protective factors overlap largely with mental health promotion.”

“Interventions to prevent mental ill-health aim to counteract risk factors and reinforce protective factors along the lifespan in order to disrupt those processes that contribute to human mental dysfunction. The more influence individual factors have on the development of mental disorders and mental health the greater the preventive effect that can be expected when they are addressed successfully. Strengthening protective factors among populations has been found to reduce depressive symptomatology. Examples include school-based programmes targeting cognitive, problemsolving and social skills of children and adolescents.”

Burn Bright believes that protective factors:

• directly decrease dysfunction;

• interact with risk factors to buffer their effects;

• disrupt the mediational chain by which risk leads to disorder; or

• prevent the initial occurrence of risk factors.

RISK AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS

PROTECTIVE FACTORS

Protective factors refer to conditions that improve people’s resistance to risk factors and disorders. They have been defined as those factors that modify, ameliorate or alter a person’s response to some environmental hazard that predisposes to a maladaptive outcome. Mostly, individual protective factors are identical to features of positive mental health, such as self-esteem, emotional resilience, positive thinking, problem-solving and social skills, stress management skills and feelings of mastery.

RISK FACTORS

Risk factors are associated with an increased probability of onset, greater severity and longer duration of major health problems.

Targeting Protective Factors

Burn Bright identifies the following 2 dimensions as a framework to develop protective factors with young people (Greenberg, Domitrovich & Bumbarger, 1999; Noble and McGrath, 2012; Keyes, 2002):

Internal – The individual

o Cognitive skills, social-cognitive skills, temperamental characteristics, and

o Emotional regulation, optimistic thinking, goal-setting skills, positive emotions, a sense of

humour.

o A sense of autonomy, self-efficacy, self-acceptance and an awareness of one’s strengths

o A sense of meaning and purpose and satisfaction with life.

o Behaviour that reflects empathy and prosocial values such as kindness, fairness and

altruism.

External – The environment, social and family settings.

o The quality of the young person’s interactions with the environment comprises the second

domain. These interactions include attachments to peers or other adults who engage in

positive health behaviours and have prosocial values.

o Social – skills, integration, interest, coherence,

o Peer to peer relationships – positive relations and acceptance of others

o Parent-child relationships

o Relationships with a caring adult

o Contributing to society (leadership)

OUR VISION AND MISSION

OUR VISION IS FOR A WORLD WHERE ALL YOUNG PEOPLE:

OUR MISSION TO ACHIEVE OUR VISION IS:

OUR KEY PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT THEORIES

OUR PROGRAM DELIVERY

DOWNLOAD OUR FULL THEORY OF CHANGE DOCUMENT

REFERENCES

Greenberg, M. T., Domitrovich, C., & Bumbarger, B. (1999). Preventing mental disorders in school-age children: A review of the effectiveness of prevention programs. Prevention Research Center for the Promotion of Human Development, College of Health and Human Development, Pennsylvania State University.

Noble, Toni & Mcgrath, Helen. (2012). Wellbeing and Resilience. Young People and the Role of Positive Relationships. 10.1007/978-94-007-2147-0_2.

Keyes, C. (2002). The mental health continuum: from languishing to flourishing in life. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 43(2), 207–222.

World Health Organization. (2011). Mental health: strengthening mental health promotion. Retrieved 1st Feb 2020, from http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs220/en/

World Health Organization. (2005). Promoting mental health: Concepts, emerging evidence, practice: A report of the World Health Organization, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse in collaboration with the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation and the University of Melbourne. Geneva: World Health Organization.